The Kara-Khitai empire was established by Yelü Dashi, who led nomadic Khitans west by way of Mongolia after the collapse of the Liao Dynasty

The Khitans ruled from their capital at Balasagun (in today's Kyrgyzstan), directly controlling the central region of the empire
The Khitan rulers adopted many administrative elements from the Liao Dynasty, including the use of Confucian administration and imperial trappings.

The empire also adopted the title of Gurkhan (universal Khan).[10] The Khitans used the Chinese calendar, maintained Chinese imperial and administrative titles, gave its emperors reign names, used Chinese-styled coins, and sent imperial seals to its vassals

The Khitans maintained their old customs, even in Central Asia. They remained nomads, adhered to their traditional dress, and maintained the religious practices followed by the Liao Dynasty Khitans

The Kara-Khitans became absorbed into the Mongol empire; a segment of the Kara-Khitan troops had previously already joined the Mongol army fighting against Kuchlug. Another segment of the Kara-Khitans, in a dynasty founded by Buraq Hajib, survived in Kirman as a vassal of the Mongols, but ceased to exist as an entity during the reign of the MongolIlkhanid ruler Öljaitü.[13] The Kara-Khitans were dispersed widely all over Eurasia as part of the Mongol army. In the 14th century, they began to lose their ethnic identity, traces of their presence however may be found as clan names or toponyms from Afghanistan to Moldova. Today a Khitay tribe still lives in northern Kyrgyzstan.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kara-Khitan_Khanate

Three Warriors FightingKara-Khitans




























http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kara-Khitan_Khanate